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Location: UFOUpDatesList.Com > 1999 > Jan > Jan 22

Re: Santilli Knew 'Tent Footage' Was a Fraud?

From: Roger Evans <moviestuff@cyberjunkie.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 08:20:40 +0000
Fwd Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 16:10:15 -0500
Subject: Re: Santilli Knew 'Tent Footage' Was a Fraud?


>From: James Easton <pulsar@compuserve.com>
>Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 21:41:31 -0500
>Fwd Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 01:16:26 -0500
>Subject: Santilli Knew 'Tent Footage' Was a Fraud?

Previously, James had offered:

>The seller of the film apparently went on to offer Santilli 15
>cans of undeveloped film, filmed by him while in the military,
>of the Roswell crash scene from the ground and air, and of the
>alien autopsies.

<snip>

>The man dragged out the old cans
>and permitted a small piece of film to be cut from the leader on
>one film to be taken to London for analyses.   According to
>Santilli, Kodac (sic) in London reported that the film was of
>about 1948 vintage.

<snip>

>At the end of 1995, Ray explained, "I mentioned this to a
>researcher in the early days, before we had completed the
>processing of the reels. It was a mistake on my part. I repeated
>what the cameraman had told me and expected no problem with the
>development of the film. Unfortunately the film on this reel was
>too badly damaged to retrieve an image".

Hi James,

As Bob Shell pointed out in an earlier post, 16mm B&W motion
picture film from 1947 would have to be processed totally
different since it would require different chemicals at a lower
temperature. Bob correctly pointed out that the emulsion of the
old film would come right off using contemporary processing.

If the info about Santilli processing the film is true, then it
should be fairly easy to find the lab that did the work.

Why? For starters, at least here in the states, B&W motion
picture processing is harder to find since most labs limit
themselves to color neg. Therefore, the number of labs equipped
to handle B&W are going to be fewer in number. On top of that,
the rolls would certainly require special handling for the
technical reason mentioned earlier. Such an event would require
the changing of the chemicals, experimentation of development
times and temperatures; basically taking over the entire
processing chain just for this one job. And, as Santilli
supposedly mentioned, there were problems with the film, I
suppose, because of age.

There would not be too many labs that could do this kind of
work, to begin with, and certainly the lab involved would have a
record of such an unusual project!

I hope this helps.

Take care,

Roger Evans


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