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Location: UFOUpDatesList.Com > 2003 > Dec > Dec 14

Re: Alien Abductee Stress - Scherk

From: William Scott Scherk <wss@uniserve.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2003 08:40:26 -0800
Fwd Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2003 15:47:37 -0500
Subject: Re:  Alien Abductee Stress - Scherk


>From: Dave Morton <Marspyrs@aol.com>
>To: ufoupdates@virtuallystrange.net
>Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2003 18:17:34 EST
>Subject: Re: Alien Abductee Stress

>>From: William Scott Scherk <wss@uniserve.com>
>>To: UFO UpDates - Toronto <ufoupdates@virtuallystrange.net>
>>Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2003 08:11:06 -0800
>>Subject: Alien Abductee Stress


>Intriguing article from ScienCentral.com
___________________________________________

>Source: ScienCentral.com

>http://www.sciencentral.com/articles/view.php3?article_id=218392122

<snip>

Fascinating.

---------------

>William - this might interest you:

>For sale: 5 pounds of assorted nuts and bolts, some
>rust. $1.

>Also, a 45-year-old lawnmower. Doesn't run. The blade
>housing (the protective shield) has partially
>corroded along the top surface, leaving dangerous
>holes. 4-cycle B&S engine, 1 sparkplug. $5.


What I found intriguing was the range of opinion in the
ScienCentral article.

As you know, McNally and colleagues had earlier done some
interesting research on three other groups: those who always
remembered child sexual abuse; those who 'recovered' memories of
child sexual abuse; and those who believed that they had once
been sexually abused, but had no memories of such a thing.

As you can imagine, Greg, there were some objections to this
line of research. The findings that there were differences in
several psychological measure were challenged - not least that
differences in measures of dissociation and absorption among the
'repressed memory' cohort could be correlated with the
(unremembered) trauma itself:

See:

McNally, R. J., Clancy, S. A., Schacter, D. L., & Pitman,  R. K.
(2000). Personality profiles, dissociation, and absorption in
women reporting repressed, recovered, or continuous memories of
childhood sexual abuse. Journal of Consulting and Clinical
Psychology, 68, 1033-1037.

McNally, R. J., Clancy, S. A., & Schacter, D. L. (2001).
Directed forgetting of trauma cues in adults reporting repressed
or recovered memories of childhood sexual  abuse. Journal of
Abnormal Psychology, 110, 151-156.

McNally, R. J., Clancy, S. A., Schacter, D. L., & Pitman,  R. K.
(2000). Cognitive processing of trauma cues in adults reporting
repressed, recovered, or continuous memories of childhood sexual
abuse. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 109, 355-359.

McNally, R. J., Metzger, L. J., Lasko, N. B., Clancy, S. A., &
Pitman, R. K. (1998). Directed forgetting of trauma cues in
adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse with and without
posttraumatic stress disorder. Journal of Abnormal Psychology,
107, 596-601.
____________________

These series of investigations were followed by the work
reported by ScienCentral:

Clancy, S. A., McNally, R. J., Schacter, D. L., Lenzenweger, M.
F., & Pitman, R. K. (2002). Memory distortion in people
reporting abduction by aliens. Journal of Abnormal Psychology,
111, 455-461.

Although the early series of studies was suggestive, its data
could not really _prove_ that a particular personality profile -
or differing performances - was related to the events at issue.
In other words, it could be suggested that the tendencies of the
'repressed memories' group were related to false memory
formation, but the findings were not conclusive - a horrible
trauma could just as likely have led to the measured personality
differences.


Clancy et al, however, hit upon a different angle. In this one,
different cohorts were studied: those who had 'recovered'
memories of alien abduction, and those who believed they had
been abducted on while not having memories (as with the first
series).

And in this new one, the same general results: "Hypnotic
suggestibility, depressive symptoms, and schizotypic features
were significant predictors of false recall and false
recognition."

http://tinyurl.com/z0ss

(the false recall measures were derived from the Roediger-
McDermott paradigm)

McNally and Clancy assembled a study group whose members
believed they'd recovered memories (usually under hypnosis) of
alien abduction, along with a repressed memory group whose
members believed they'd been abducted but had no conscious
memory of the event. (This group inferred their abduction from
physical abrasions, waking in strange positions or sometimes
just from their penchant for science fiction.) There was also a
terrestrially bound control group who reported no abduction
experiences.

The recovered and repressed memory groups exhibited high rates
of false recall on the word-recognition test. Those with
"intact" memories of abduction fared worse than those who
believed their memories were repressed.

And on measures of Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome, those who
believed they had been abducted had scores that were more or
less identical to those who had suffered a more widely-accepted
trauma.


WSS
www.wsse.ca